Syndicate content
Updated: 45 min 25 sec ago

Spoken Word: inCREDIBLE Elections By Hannatu Musawa

11 April 2019 - 3:22am


Democracy is an incredible gift. It is a political system that requires a popular vote to take place in order to elect the leader of a country and other officials. If practiced properly, this incredible gift can promote change, foster equality, protect people’s interest, amongst so many other benefits for the citizens. It can be incredible. However, if this incredible gift is not utilized in the proper manner, if it is applied with recklessness and a state of impunity, it can instigate corruption, may involve immoral practices during elections, it might even allow the misuse of public funds, together with so many other disadvantages for a nation. In this instance, it can be uncredible. The main tenet of this incredible gift is the conduct of credible elections.

Since the historic, peaceful, democratic transition of power to the opposition in 2015, when the then incumbent President Goodluck Jonathan of the PDP conceded defeat to General Muhammudu Buhari of the APC, national elections were just recently held in Nigeria. Those elections have now become a litmus test as to whether this time we applied a credible process in order to actualize the incredible gift we embraced four years ago. It is an assessment as to whether we took two steps forward in 2015 and four steps back in 2019.

No matter which side of the divide one is on, one must admit that the 2019 elections revealed serious shortcomings in the legal and institutional framework of Nigeria’s electoral system. If we yearn to clean up the electoral process, there’s no time to waste in ensuring fundamental reforms are made. The country is still suffering from what, I call, Post-Election-Syndrome, whereby the victors’ vociferous jubilation taunts the losers as they head to the courts seeking redress.

While the elections may have not been seen as a total disaster, many infractions during the process need to be pointed out, particularly in the gubernatorial elections.In those instances, the elections revealed the weak and partisan structure of the Election Commission in charge of the overall management of electoral process, and gaps in the Electoral Code and Constitution. In the elections, there were high levels of abuse of human rights. Official impunity characterized the process in many places. Interested parties worked overtime to manipulate the electoral system in order to remain in power.

The desperation exhibited by both the incumbent and the opposition to get the result in theirfavor, by all means, was indeed appalling. Desperate and do-or-die politicians were quick to deploy every trick they had in their kitty to influence electorates, thus disrupting the peaceful conduct of the elections. Armed soldiers were deployed in violation of several subsisting court judgments from prior elections. In many instances, the political class remained resolute in making a mockery of our electoral process. During the exercise, the electoral guidelines was set aside going by the level of intimidation of the electorates. Some local observers, as well as journalists, have gory tales to tell about their experiences during the elections - the culprits were from both sides of the divide.

Reports had it that the Kano supplementary elections were rather volatile as politicians unashamedly deployed their thugs to force electorates to do their bidding, despite the presence of security agents. Violence did certainly punctuate the voting in several locations. There were clear instances and evidence were thugs and party agents intimidated voters into voting for particular candidates. Several observer group reports showed a lot of irregularities, harassment of voters, INEC officials and abuse of the exercise. In the particular instance of Kano, the desperation and power tussle is, most likely, not unconnected to the State’s political value and calculation ahead of the 2023 elections.

The supplementary elections in Sokoto and Plateau recorded little incidents but were marred by issues of underage voting and voter inducement. While INEC has continually reiterated that underage voting is illegal, the act still flourishes. Underage voting has been a major issue in Nigeria’s political discourse since the return of democratic government in 1999. This conundrum, which successive governments have not been able to solve has thwarted the beauty of the incredible gift in the country.

Voter inducement was another major flaw of the 2019 elections. Voters were induced through engraving of pictures of candidates and political party logos on gift items during elections. And then there was the rampant strategy of covert vote buying. The gubernatorial elections in some states, where vote buying greatly influenced the electoral process, proved that it is a major consideration for victory among politicians.

With all these reported infractions in our electoral process, the first step to overhauling the system is self-awareness. We must put aside the self-righteous hyperbole and accept that in Nigeria, we, most likely, no longer enjoy a neutral electoral process in a functioning democracy worth its name. With the way these past elections were conducted, we must face the actuality that we are slowly sliding back to our old ways, back to becoming one of those struggling developing world states that needs to claw its way slowly toward democratic integrity.

Arguably, political parties have shown that they are incapable of providing candidates that are worthy of being elected and can be elected by people, based on their credibility, and that, as political parties, they can not get to power on merit except when they lure and induce people as a way to buy their candidates into power. 

All those involved in the electoral process, including the government and state institutions, the executive and legislative branches, and political parties themselves urgently need to further reach an accord on the nature and gravity of required electoral reforms needed in Nigeria. They should try to determine what should viably be done, given the political environment, and pragmatism of execution.

As a nation looking to advance and strengthen our incredible gift, we may have to seriously consider whether there should be a new type of INEC; possibly one that is entirely technical, or a peripheral mechanism with organic roles and arrangement that would assure political actors.

Aside from these intervening obstacles, the serious lack of trust amid the several actors in the electoral process, such as the civil society, the political parties, the citizens and the electoral commission must be addressed. All parties have to be ready to put aside bias and partisanship in order to attain the overhaul that may be needed to give INEC the Colonic rinse it needs.

It’s really a no brainer; in order to make our elections more credible, the Electoral Reforms Panels headed by Retired Justice Mohammed Uwais, Sheik Ahmed Lemu and Dr. Ken Nnamani respectively needs to be fully and thoroughly implemented for the country to have flawless elections in future. The Uwais panel was set up by the late President Umaru Yaradu’a and came up with a number of recommendations to improve the electoral process. In 2011, the Lemu Panel was set up by President Goodluck Jonathan and it reiterated the recommendations of the Uwais Panel and made further recommendations. In 2015, President Muhammadu Buhari set up the Ken Nnamani Panel on electoral reports. That Panel studied the recommendations of the panels that came before it and also reiterated the recommendations and made further recommendations. However, all the recommendations have been put aside by all the parties during their time.

The 2008 Uwais report recommends establishing commissions to deal with Electoral Offences, Constituency Delimitation and Political Parties Registration and Regulation. Some of the power vested in the Independent National Electoral Commission (INEC) and the State Independent Electoral Commissions would be transferred to the new commissions. It further recommended proportional representation in elections to the Federal and State legislatures and to the local government councils. The report also recommends the head of the Independent National Electoral Commission should be appointed by the judiciary, rather than the President. 

There have been and still are many calls by different groups, individuals and association for the adoption of this report. As it stands, INEC has too many tasks on hand, ranging from voter registration, monitoring of political activities to printing of materials and conducting elections. There is a need for the establishment of other commissions to perform the different tasks in such manner that they would ensure effectiveness and efficiency, leaving INEC to function optimally with fewer tasks.

The primary responsibility of this much needed reform lies with the government and the legislature, although civil society can inform public opinion and guide politicians, who are otherwise too preoccupied with their partisan interests, away from driving the process to a stalemate. 

Moving forward, it is paramount for us to ensure that future elections are carried out in a free, fair, transparent and credible manner. This would mean implementing an environment of trust, which can be facilitated through the application of some of the measures suggested above.

The factors that resulted in inconclusive elections such as violence, vote buying, over voting, underage voting, and cancellation have clearly repeated themselves in these past elections. Sadly, the factors became worse due to the desperation of politicians who turned elections into a do or die affair. There is need for a serious national conversation on critical areas of improvement in the conduct of elections in Nigeria. A revisit to the Justice Uwais electoral reform has become quite essential.

Democracy’s incredible gift is meant to provide an enabling environment for everyone to feel safe. It is supposed to be a tool where leaders are elected credibly. If we allow our process to be uncredible, we will not enjoy its gift, because, for our democracy to be incredible, our elections must be credible.

 

Spoken Word Article Written by
Hannatu Musawa
I invite you to:
Follow me on Twitter- @hanneymusawa
Follow me on Instagram- hanneymusawa
Follow me on Snapchat- hannatumusawa
Send me an e-mail- hannatumusawaspokenword@gmail.com
Visit my Website- www.hanneymusawa.com
Like my Facebook- www.facebook.com/hannatu.musawa
Subscribe to my Youtube Channel-www.youtube.com/HannatuMusawa

Opinion AddThis :  Original Author :  Hannatu Musawa Disable advertisements : 
Categories: audio

Nigeria's Motunrayo Alaka Named Among Seven John S. Knight 2019 Fellows

11 April 2019 - 2:53am


Motunrayo Alaka, Coordinator of the Wole Soyinka Centre for Investigative Journalism (WSCIJ), is one of only seven individuals from Africa, Europe and South America selected into the 2019-20 class of the prestigious John S. Knight Journalism Fellowships at Stanford University in California, United States.

In its official announcement on Wednesday evening, JSK described the fellows as people “in the vanguard of transforming journalism”. 

“They are leading collaborations to share investigative resources, stories and training; reshaping storytelling in organizations large and small; and championing press freedom in the midst of government attacks on the media,” it said.

The JSK class comprises journalists from Brazil, Israel, Nigeria, Poland, the United Kingdom, Venezuela and Zimbabwe. They will be joined by the Us members of the class, who will be named on May 1.

“We are fortunate to have this group of terrific international journalists join the JSK community,” said Dawn Garcia, Director of the JSK Fellowships.

“They are bringing their tremendous drive and passion for journalism to Stanford University, which will welcome and celebrate their diverse perspectives and experiences. We are eager to have them make use of the vast resources available at one of the world’s top universities, and we look forward to seeing their ideas thrive. We can’t wait to learn from them and their families.”

Beginning in September, the JSK Class of 2019-2020 will spend 10 months at Stanford strengthening their leadership skills while working on projects that address some of the most urgent issues in journalism. 

They and their spouses and partners will have the opportunity to sit in on Stanford classes and to access a diverse range of interdisciplinary experts and events at Stanford and across Silicon Valley.

The fellows will test ideas and perform experiments aligned with the primary objectives of the JSK Fellowships: challenging misinformation and disinformation; holding the powerful accountable; strengthening local news; and fighting bias, intolerance and injustice.

Expressing happiness at her emergence as a JSK fellow, Alaka told SaharaReporters: “The John S. Knight Fellowship is one of the oldest and most prestigious fellowships in the world. The fact that it is hosted by the equally prestigious Stanford University is an additional advantage. 

“I am so glad that I get to put Nigeria on the map as I join the league of some of the most respected change-makers in the world. This is without a doubt one of the most significant milestones of my career. I am enthusiastically looking forward to meeting and working with other JSK fellows from all over the world. I am excited about what this portends for the significant work that the Wole Soyinka Centre for Investigative Journalism does to ensure truly open democracies in Nigeria and beyond.”

Alaka’s WSCIJ, based in Lagos, is a not-for-profit, non-governmental organisation with social justice programmes aimed at exposing corruption, regulatory failures and human rights abuses with the tool of investigative journalism. Since 2005, it has been organising Nigeria’s most prestigious investigative reporting award, the Wole Soyinka Award for Investigative Reporting (WSAIR).

The six other non-US fellows are Omri Assenheim, investigative journalist and author, Uvda, Tel Aviv, Israel; Divine Dube, editor-in-chief, The Citizen Bulletin, Bulawayo, Zimbabwe; Anna Gielewska, journalist, Wprost, and Vice President, Reporters Foundation, Warsaw, Poland Lyle and Corrine Nelson International Fellow.

Others are Alastair Leithead, Africa correspondent based in Nairobi, Kenya, BBC, United Kingdom; Natália Mazotte, Executive Director, Open Knowledge Foundation, São Paulo, Brazil Knight Latin American Fellow; and Joseph Poliszuk, Editor and Co-founder, Armando.info, Caracas, Venezuela

More than 1,000 fellows from over 80 countries have been a part of the programme since it was founded in 1966. 

International News AddThis :  Featured Image :  Original Author :  SaharaReporters, New York Disable advertisements : 
Categories: audio

Nigeria's Motunrayo Alaka Named Among Seven John S. Knight 2019 Fellows

11 April 2019 - 2:53am


Motunrayo Alaka, Coordinator of the Wole Soyinka Centre for Investigative Journalism (WSCIJ), is one of only seven individuals from Africa, Europe and South America selected into the 2019-20 class of the prestigious John S. Knight Journalism Fellowships at Stanford University in California, United States.

In its official announcement on Wednesday evening, JSK described the fellows as people “in the vanguard of transforming journalism”. 

“They are leading collaborations to share investigative resources, stories and training; reshaping storytelling in organizations large and small; and championing press freedom in the midst of government attacks on the media,” it said.

The JSK class comprises journalists from Brazil, Israel, Nigeria, Poland, the United Kingdom, Venezuela and Zimbabwe. They will be joined by the Us members of the class, who will be named on May 1.

“We are fortunate to have this group of terrific international journalists join the JSK community,” said Dawn Garcia, Director of the JSK Fellowships.

“They are bringing their tremendous drive and passion for journalism to Stanford University, which will welcome and celebrate their diverse perspectives and experiences. We are eager to have them make use of the vast resources available at one of the world’s top universities, and we look forward to seeing their ideas thrive. We can’t wait to learn from them and their families.”

Beginning in September, the JSK Class of 2019-2020 will spend 10 months at Stanford strengthening their leadership skills while working on projects that address some of the most urgent issues in journalism. 

They and their spouses and partners will have the opportunity to sit in on Stanford classes and to access a diverse range of interdisciplinary experts and events at Stanford and across Silicon Valley.

The fellows will test ideas and perform experiments aligned with the primary objectives of the JSK Fellowships: challenging misinformation and disinformation; holding the powerful accountable; strengthening local news; and fighting bias, intolerance and injustice.

Expressing happiness at her emergence as a JSK fellow, Alaka told SaharaReporters: “The John S. Knight Fellowship is one of the oldest and most prestigious fellowships in the world. The fact that it is hosted by the equally prestigious Stanford University is an additional advantage. 

“I am so glad that I get to put Nigeria on the map as I join the league of some of the most respected change-makers in the world. This is without a doubt one of the most significant milestones of my career. I am enthusiastically looking forward to meeting and working with other JSK fellows from all over the world. I am excited about what this portends for the significant work that the Wole Soyinka Centre for Investigative Journalism does to ensure truly open democracies in Nigeria and beyond.”

Alaka’s WSCIJ, based in Lagos, is a not-for-profit, non-governmental organisation with social justice programmes aimed at exposing corruption, regulatory failures and human rights abuses with the tool of investigative journalism. Since 2005, it has been organising Nigeria’s most prestigious investigative reporting award, the Wole Soyinka Award for Investigative Reporting (WSAIR).

The six other non-US fellows are Omri Assenheim, investigative journalist and author, Uvda, Tel Aviv, Israel; Divine Dube, editor-in-chief, The Citizen Bulletin, Bulawayo, Zimbabwe; Anna Gielewska, journalist, Wprost, and Vice President, Reporters Foundation, Warsaw, Poland Lyle and Corrine Nelson International Fellow.

Others are Alastair Leithead, Africa correspondent based in Nairobi, Kenya, BBC, United Kingdom; Natália Mazotte, Executive Director, Open Knowledge Foundation, São Paulo, Brazil Knight Latin American Fellow; and Joseph Poliszuk, Editor and Co-founder, Armando.info, Caracas, Venezuela

More than 1,000 fellows from over 80 countries have been a part of the programme since it was founded in 1966. 

International News AddThis :  Featured Image :  Original Author :  SaharaReporters, New York Disable advertisements : 
Categories: audio

To Dobale Or Not To Dabale: Speaking Back To My Oga Culture By James Yeku

11 April 2019 - 2:29am



So in the early 1990s, you enroll in a Ph.D. program as a brilliant mathematician but spend the next 22 years of your life on it, seeking perfection (in the hope that you win a major prize one day) and never actually completing it until you pass on. Allegedly because of suicide. That's the official narrative of a series of events authorities at the University of Ibadan are describing as "strange." Without knowing the particularities of the Aminu Zubairu's situation, it is difficult to effectively assess things, but to a large extent, like anybody who has attended a university in Nigeria will tell you, Zubairu's protracted doctoral training at UI is not an isolated event.

While not interested in circulating any essentializing narratives of the University of Ibadan as the first and best institution of higher learning in Nigeria, we can at least expect the country's leading campus to welcome some scrutiny and reflection. For one of the best universities in Africa, you wonder why the need to insist on institutional practices not tainted by mediocrity trumps the more crucial task of addressing the enabling circumstances that facilitate a doctoral training of over two decades. In its haste to defend what the University of Ibadan believes to be its excellent academic culture, the university authorities failed to recognize an important opportunity to have a necessary conversation on the often long completion rate of Ph.D. education in Nigeria. As the leading postgraduate center in Nigeria, that should matter to UI.

Important also is the failure to recognize the lingering mental health problems that arise from a well-known vindictive culture that victimizes its own students and insolently demands servitude, as well as the general culture of graduate education, which many students would disavow for its complicity in their academic misfortunes.

For those defending UI's position on the Zubairu case, invoking the anecdotal testimony of a former head of Zubairu's department who writes to discredit the views and experiences of a certain an alumnus of the institution (Samule Edet) cannot be enough. Who does not know that the DOBALE culture many speak about is a reality for most Ph.D. candidates? As a matter of fact, some of us heard that term for the first time from professors who endured a similar fate and who appeared to believe all hell would be let loose on them if they did not perpetuate the same morbidity. We can surely do better than the politicians we love to hate and curse in the ivory tower, knowing that the same politics of patronage we see in Abuja is rife on many campuses in Nigeria. To call UI or another elite campus out on issues such as the parlous misreading of a tragic moment is not a Freudian impulse to kill our academic forbears and derogate an alma mater that is dear to many. It is to eschew the culture of mediocrity that UI believes cannot be found in its ranks.

Until we abandon a system in which my Oga or Oga mi (the Ph.D. supervisor) as the idiom of the power imbalance in our student-supervisor relationships is the norm, it is hard to visualize how students can be the focus of their own training, owning their learning without unnecessary deference for cultural politics that have no relevance to professional training. I thought a good way of responding to Zubairu's tragic circumstances was to disavow the prebendal culture many students complain about and to publicly affirm our commitment to disrupting it at an institutional level.

But of course, oga culture says it is career suicide to speak back to your teachers in Nigeria. How dare you have an opinion? My Oga "trained" and "made" me. I, therefore, have no moral right to question their actions or practices. if I must, I have to be tactful and position myself discursively to show a certain performative deference. As somebody who has had more training abroad, Your boldness to speak back to oga culture makes the most arrogant scum of the earth. "Just because he traveled out of the country, he thinks he is now better than the rest of us," oga would wager. Never mind that at some level, Oga has experienced a working system at Oxford or Capetown, but how dare you speak truth to power? To do so as a young alumnus who lives in Nigeria is to risk being discredited and even threatened in some cases.

Just to be clear, the paradox is lost on university authorities who attempt to silence students seeking to exercise the same values of free speech and critical thinking the university proudly teaches in the first place. You do a disservice to the rich tradition of humanistic enquiry for which a campus such as the University of Ibadan is famously known when we foreclose the perspectives of students because of their age, location, or status. I am not acquainted with Edet the alumnus the former chair of UI's Mathematics department responded to in his interview with the press, but I do know that UI can take this opportunity to reflect on the welfare of students and university practices that make many academic environments in Nigeria a hostile space that fosters depression and many other serious mental health problems that are routinely normalized by Oga culture.

My first response when I heard about Aminu Zubair was to inquire from a former colleague at UI about a professor of mine whose Ph.D. was also taking forever to complete. I doubt if he completed it as at when I concluded my first degree. He probably did later, after my own seven years of UG and grad studies at UI. Those were years of hard work and the best of training from some of the most rigorous and finest scholars in the world. It is because of their student-centered and activist pedagogy that I dare to comment on an unfortunate event. I hope UI will shun oga culture, out of respect for Zubairu and his family, by concluding what they have called an investigation into the case. One hopes they also address the larger problematic circumstances that make oga culture thrive. It is the right thing to do.

James Yeku
Department of English
University of Saskatchewan, SK Canada

Opinion AddThis :  Original Author :  James Yeku Disable advertisements : 
Categories: audio

To Dobale Or Not To Dabale: Speaking Back To My Oga Culture By James Yeku

11 April 2019 - 2:29am



So in the early 1990s, you enroll in a Ph.D. program as a brilliant mathematician but spend the next 22 years of your life on it, seeking perfection (in the hope that you win a major prize one day) and never actually completing it until you pass on. Allegedly because of suicide. That's the official narrative of a series of events authorities at the University of Ibadan are describing as "strange." Without knowing the particularities of the Aminu Zubairu's situation, it is difficult to effectively assess things, but to a large extent, like anybody who has attended a university in Nigeria will tell you, Zubairu's protracted doctoral training at UI is not an isolated event.

While not interested in circulating any essentializing narratives of the University of Ibadan as the first and best institution of higher learning in Nigeria, we can at least expect the country's leading campus to welcome some scrutiny and reflection. For one of the best universities in Africa, you wonder why the need to insist on institutional practices not tainted by mediocrity trumps the more crucial task of addressing the enabling circumstances that facilitate a doctoral training of over two decades. In its haste to defend what the University of Ibadan believes to be its excellent academic culture, the university authorities failed to recognize an important opportunity to have a necessary conversation on the often long completion rate of Ph.D. education in Nigeria. As the leading postgraduate center in Nigeria, that should matter to UI.

Important also is the failure to recognize the lingering mental health problems that arise from a well-known vindictive culture that victimizes its own students and insolently demands servitude, as well as the general culture of graduate education, which many students would disavow for its complicity in their academic misfortunes.

For those defending UI's position on the Zubairu case, invoking the anecdotal testimony of a former head of Zubairu's department who writes to discredit the views and experiences of a certain an alumnus of the institution (Samule Edet) cannot be enough. Who does not know that the DOBALE culture many speak about is a reality for most Ph.D. candidates? As a matter of fact, some of us heard that term for the first time from professors who endured a similar fate and who appeared to believe all hell would be let loose on them if they did not perpetuate the same morbidity. We can surely do better than the politicians we love to hate and curse in the ivory tower, knowing that the same politics of patronage we see in Abuja is rife on many campuses in Nigeria. To call UI or another elite campus out on issues such as the parlous misreading of a tragic moment is not a Freudian impulse to kill our academic forbears and derogate an alma mater that is dear to many. It is to eschew the culture of mediocrity that UI believes cannot be found in its ranks.

Until we abandon a system in which my Oga or Oga mi (the Ph.D. supervisor) as the idiom of the power imbalance in our student-supervisor relationships is the norm, it is hard to visualize how students can be the focus of their own training, owning their learning without unnecessary deference for cultural politics that have no relevance to professional training. I thought a good way of responding to Zubairu's tragic circumstances was to disavow the prebendal culture many students complain about and to publicly affirm our commitment to disrupting it at an institutional level.

But of course, oga culture says it is career suicide to speak back to your teachers in Nigeria. How dare you have an opinion? My Oga "trained" and "made" me. I, therefore, have no moral right to question their actions or practices. if I must, I have to be tactful and position myself discursively to show a certain performative deference. As somebody who has had more training abroad, Your boldness to speak back to oga culture makes the most arrogant scum of the earth. "Just because he traveled out of the country, he thinks he is now better than the rest of us," oga would wager. Never mind that at some level, Oga has experienced a working system at Oxford or Capetown, but how dare you speak truth to power? To do so as a young alumnus who lives in Nigeria is to risk being discredited and even threatened in some cases.

Just to be clear, the paradox is lost on university authorities who attempt to silence students seeking to exercise the same values of free speech and critical thinking the university proudly teaches in the first place. You do a disservice to the rich tradition of humanistic enquiry for which a campus such as the University of Ibadan is famously known when we foreclose the perspectives of students because of their age, location, or status. I am not acquainted with Edet the alumnus the former chair of UI's Mathematics department responded to in his interview with the press, but I do know that UI can take this opportunity to reflect on the welfare of students and university practices that make many academic environments in Nigeria a hostile space that fosters depression and many other serious mental health problems that are routinely normalized by Oga culture.

My first response when I heard about Aminu Zubair was to inquire from a former colleague at UI about a professor of mine whose Ph.D. was also taking forever to complete. I doubt if he completed it as at when I concluded my first degree. He probably did later, after my own seven years of UG and grad studies at UI. Those were years of hard work and the best of training from some of the most rigorous and finest scholars in the world. It is because of their student-centered and activist pedagogy that I dare to comment on an unfortunate event. I hope UI will shun oga culture, out of respect for Zubairu and his family, by concluding what they have called an investigation into the case. One hopes they also address the larger problematic circumstances that make oga culture thrive. It is the right thing to do.

James Yeku
Department of English
University of Saskatchewan, SK Canada

Opinion AddThis :  Original Author :  James Yeku Disable advertisements : 
Categories: audio

Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir Forced To Quit After 30 Years In Power

11 April 2019 - 2:18am

Omar al-Bashir, President of Sudan, is set to step down after 30 years in power.

According to Arab newspaper Al Arabiya, the Khartoum airport has been closed down and a counter-coup attempt in Sudan has failed. 

Although, a gathering of Sudanese professionals has confirmed it will accept only the handover of power to a civilian transitional government, the Sudanese Army has announced the formation of an interim council headed by Awad Ibn Auft, the first Vice-President.

The paper quoted sources as saying men of the Sudanese Army were reported to have stormed the home of Awad al-Jazz, assistant to President al-Bashir, while Sudanese Prime Minister Mohamed Tahir Ayala had been arrested, with al-Bashir prevented from departing Sudan on Wednesday.

Sudanese military vehicles were deployed on key roads, bridges in Khartoum and people were chanting “it has fallen, we won", as soldiers raided the headquarters of the Islamic movement led by Bashir in Khartoum.

Al-Bashir has been President of Sudan since 1989 when, as a brigadier in the Sudanese Army, he led a group of officers in a military coup that ousted the democratically elected government of Prime Minister Sadiq al-Mahdi.

Since then, he has been elected three times as President in elections marred by electoral fraud.

In 2009, al-Bashir became the first sitting President to be indicted by the International Criminal Court (ICC) for allegedly directing a campaign of mass killing, rape, and pillage against civilians in Darfur.

International News AddThis :  Featured Image :  Original Author :  SaharaReporters, New York Disable advertisements : 
Categories: audio

Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir Forced To Quit After 30 Years In Power

11 April 2019 - 2:18am

Omar al-Bashir, President of Sudan, is set to step down after 30 years in power.

According to Arab newspaper Al Arabiya, the Khartoum airport has been closed down and a counter-coup attempt in Sudan has failed. 

Although, a gathering of Sudanese professionals has confirmed it will accept only the handover of power to a civilian transitional government, the Sudanese Army has announced the formation of an interim council headed by Awad Ibn Auft, the first Vice-President.

The paper quoted sources as saying men of the Sudanese Army were reported to have stormed the home of Awad al-Jazz, assistant to President al-Bashir, while Sudanese Prime Minister Mohamed Tahir Ayala had been arrested, with al-Bashir prevented from departing Sudan on Wednesday.

Sudanese military vehicles were deployed on key roads, bridges in Khartoum and people were chanting “it has fallen, we won", as soldiers raided the headquarters of the Islamic movement led by Bashir in Khartoum.

Al-Bashir has been President of Sudan since 1989 when, as a brigadier in the Sudanese Army, he led a group of officers in a military coup that ousted the democratically elected government of Prime Minister Sadiq al-Mahdi.

Since then, he has been elected three times as President in elections marred by electoral fraud.

In 2009, al-Bashir became the first sitting President to be indicted by the International Criminal Court (ICC) for allegedly directing a campaign of mass killing, rape, and pillage against civilians in Darfur.

International News AddThis :  Featured Image :  Original Author :  SaharaReporters, New York Disable advertisements : 
Categories: audio

Our Debts Are Sustainable, Says Nigerian Government

11 April 2019 - 1:46am


The Nigerian government has said the country's debt profile is sustainable, hence there is no reason for worry.

Udoma Udo Udoma, Minister of Budget and National Planning, stated this at the end of the Federal Executive Council (FEC) meeting on Wednesday.

In its report on 'Nigerian Domestic and Foreign Debt Data', the National Bureau of Statistics (NBS) said Nigeria’s foreign debt stood at $25.27billion as at December 31, 2018.

However, speaking with State House correspondents, Udoma said: “Our debts are sustainable. We do have a revenue challenge and we are focusing on that. Once the revenues come up, it will be obvious that we don’t have a debt problem at all.”

He said the Nigerian government is working on a number of initiatives to increase the country’s revenues.

“We are looking at initiatives to widen the tax pays. We are looking at initiatives to increase efficiency in collections. We are looking at a single window, which will help to increase efficiency, customs collections.

We are looking at many different ways to improve revenue,” the minister said.
 

Money Politics News AddThis :  Original Author :  SaharaReporters, New York Disable advertisements : 
Categories: audio

Our Debts Are Sustainable, Says Nigerian Government

11 April 2019 - 1:46am


The Nigerian government has said the country's debt profile is sustainable, hence there is no reason for worry.

Udoma Udo Udoma, Minister of Budget and National Planning, stated this at the end of the Federal Executive Council (FEC) meeting on Wednesday.

In its report on 'Nigerian Domestic and Foreign Debt Data', the National Bureau of Statistics (NBS) said Nigeria’s foreign debt stood at $25.27billion as at December 31, 2018.

However, speaking with State House correspondents, Udoma said: “Our debts are sustainable. We do have a revenue challenge and we are focusing on that. Once the revenues come up, it will be obvious that we don’t have a debt problem at all.”

He said the Nigerian government is working on a number of initiatives to increase the country’s revenues.

“We are looking at initiatives to widen the tax pays. We are looking at initiatives to increase efficiency in collections. We are looking at a single window, which will help to increase efficiency, customs collections.

We are looking at many different ways to improve revenue,” the minister said.
 

Money Politics News AddThis :  Original Author :  SaharaReporters, New York Disable advertisements : 
Categories: audio

IOM: 1.8 Million People Lack Access To Basic Amenities In Nigeria's North-East

11 April 2019 - 1:45am


Attah Ikechukwu, Head of Information for International Organisation for Migration (IOM), has said 1.8 million men, women and children displaced in the northeastern part of Nigeria lack access to water, shelter and other vital resources that make life comfortable.

In a statement issued on Wednesday, the IOM said 7.1 million people have been affected by the security challenges in the Northeastern part of Nigeria.

Ikechukwu said: “In addition to the displaced population, 1.56 million individuals have returned to their communities since August 2015, due to the expanded presence of security forces. However, the infrastructure in these areas is still severely damaged or destroyed and essential services are yet to be fully restored.

“People in Gwoza town, Borno State, for example, spend several hours a day under the scorching sun searching for water, often in unsafe and hand-dug wells. The lack of infrastructure leaves no other option as the limited available resources are overstretched by the needs of displaced and returnee populations.”

The IOM Head of Information added that the international organisation has completed the drilling of an additional borehole in Damboa, as well as the rehabilitation of a community market in Konduga and two primary schools in Mandarari and Pulka, benefitting approximately 6,000 individuals.
 

International Poverty News AddThis :  Original Author :  SaharaReporters, New York Disable advertisements : 
Categories: audio

IOM: 1.8 Million People Lack Access To Basic Amenities In Nigeria's North-East

11 April 2019 - 1:45am


The International Organisation for Migration (IOM) has said 1.8 million men, women and children displaced in the northeastern part of Nigeria lack access to water, shelter and other vital resources that make life comfortable.

In a statement issued on Wednesday, the IOM said 7.1 million people have been affected by the security challenges in the Northeastern part of Nigeria.

“In addition to the displaced population, 1.56 million individuals have returned to their communities since August 2015, due to the expanded presence of security forces. However, the infrastructure in these areas is still severely damaged or destroyed and essential services are yet to be fully restored," the agency said.

“People in Gwoza town, Borno State, for example, spend several hours a day under the scorching sun searching for water, often in unsafe and hand-dug wells. The lack of infrastructure leaves no other option as the limited available resources are overstretched by the needs of displaced and returnee populations.”

The body added that it had s completed the drilling of an additional borehole in Damboa, as well as the rehabilitation of a community market in Konduga and two primary schools in Mandarari and Pulka, benefitting approximately 6,000 individuals.
 

International Poverty News AddThis :  Featured Image :  Original Author :  SaharaReporters, New York Disable advertisements : 
Categories: audio

IMF Warns Nigeria On Terms Of Loans From China

11 April 2019 - 1:39am


Tobias Adrian

Tobias Adrian AFP

Tobias Andrian, Director of International Monetary Fund (IMF) Monetary and Capital Markets Department, warned Nigeria and other emerging market countries taking loans from China to consider the terms of such facilities, especially their compliance with the Paris Club arrangements.

The IMF director said this on Wednesday, while speaking at the ongoing IMF/World Bank Spring Meetings in the United States.

He said there was nothing bad in borrowing from China, except that the terms of such loans are always questionable.

He said: “Loans from China are good, but the countries should consider the terms of the loans. And we urge countries that when they borrow from abroad, that the terms are favourable for the borrower, and should be conforming to the Paris Club arrangements.

“Let me reiterate that in many frontier markets, we see that the share of debt that is not conforming to the Paris Club standards is on the rise. And that means that if there is any debt restructuring down the road one day, that can be very unfavourable to those countries. So, the borrowing terms, the covenants, are extremely important. And we do see a deterioration in that aspect.”

Andrian said Nigeria had been borrowing from international markets, which gives the IMF some worries. He, however, noted that such loans are good as they allow the country to invest more, but expressed concerns over rollover or repayment risks.

“At the moment, funding conditions in economies such as Nigeria and other Sub-Saharan African countries, are very favourable but that might change at some point. And there is risk of rollovers and whether the need for refinancing can be met in the future,” the IMF director said, advising that Nigeria should seek higher capital for its banks through recapitalisation and also tackle rising non-performing loans in the sector.

He said: “We advise countries that where those downside risks are increasing, to take more steps to ensure that vulnerabilities are not rising too much. 

"Addressing non-performing loans is a first order importance for financial stability. Many countries have tackled that by developing secondary market for non-performing loans, and by being aggressive in writing off non-performing loans and through provisioning and use of improved accounting standards through International Financial Reporting Standards 9 (IFRS 9)."

According to Adrian, many countries do not have all the tools that are necessary to ensure that the system is financially stable, hence the financial stability concerns can feed into monetary policy decisions. He, therefore, urged monetary policy makers to also look at risks to financial stability both in the short term and in the medium term.

As a way out of the crisis, the IMF director advised policymakers to develop and deploy macro-prudential tools which can mitigate vulnerabilities and make the financial system more resilient.

“Emerging markets facing volatile capital flows should limit their reliance on short-term overseas debt and ensure they have adequate foreign currency reserves and bank buffers. Besides, monetary policy should be data dependent and well communicated,” he said.

International Money News AddThis :  Original Author :  SaharaReporters, New York Disable advertisements : 
Categories: audio

IMF Warns Nigeria On Terms Of Loans From China

11 April 2019 - 1:39am


Tobias Adrian

Tobias Adrian AFP

Tobias Andrian, Director of International Monetary Fund (IMF) Monetary and Capital Markets Department, warned Nigeria and other emerging market countries taking loans from China to consider the terms of such facilities, especially their compliance with the Paris Club arrangements.

The IMF director said this on Wednesday, while speaking at the ongoing IMF/World Bank Spring Meetings in the United States.

He said there was nothing bad in borrowing from China, except that the terms of such loans are always questionable.

He said: “Loans from China are good, but the countries should consider the terms of the loans. And we urge countries that when they borrow from abroad, that the terms are favourable for the borrower, and should be conforming to the Paris Club arrangements.

“Let me reiterate that in many frontier markets, we see that the share of debt that is not conforming to the Paris Club standards is on the rise. And that means that if there is any debt restructuring down the road one day, that can be very unfavourable to those countries. So, the borrowing terms, the covenants, are extremely important. And we do see a deterioration in that aspect.”

Andrian said Nigeria had been borrowing from international markets, which gives the IMF some worries. He, however, noted that such loans are good as they allow the country to invest more, but expressed concerns over rollover or repayment risks.

“At the moment, funding conditions in economies such as Nigeria and other Sub-Saharan African countries, are very favourable but that might change at some point. And there is risk of rollovers and whether the need for refinancing can be met in the future,” the IMF director said, advising that Nigeria should seek higher capital for its banks through recapitalisation and also tackle rising non-performing loans in the sector.

He said: “We advise countries that where those downside risks are increasing, to take more steps to ensure that vulnerabilities are not rising too much. 

"Addressing non-performing loans is a first order importance for financial stability. Many countries have tackled that by developing secondary market for non-performing loans, and by being aggressive in writing off non-performing loans and through provisioning and use of improved accounting standards through International Financial Reporting Standards 9 (IFRS 9)."

According to Adrian, many countries do not have all the tools that are necessary to ensure that the system is financially stable, hence the financial stability concerns can feed into monetary policy decisions. He, therefore, urged monetary policy makers to also look at risks to financial stability both in the short term and in the medium term.

As a way out of the crisis, the IMF director advised policymakers to develop and deploy macro-prudential tools which can mitigate vulnerabilities and make the financial system more resilient.

“Emerging markets facing volatile capital flows should limit their reliance on short-term overseas debt and ensure they have adequate foreign currency reserves and bank buffers. Besides, monetary policy should be data dependent and well communicated,” he said.

International Money News AddThis :  Original Author :  SaharaReporters, New York Disable advertisements : 
Categories: audio

PDP Has Taken Freedom Of Speech Too Far, Says AGF

11 April 2019 - 1:32am


AGF Abubakar Malami

AGF Abubakar Malami

Abubakar Malami, Nigeria’s Attorney-General of the Federation and Minister of Justice, says the Peoples Democratic Party (PDP) has taken freedom of speech too far by accusing him of plans to influence the

Supreme Court judgment on the Rivers State chapter of the All Progressives Congress (APC).

Dismissing the allegation on Wednesday while addressing State House correspondents in Abuja, Malami said the PDP exercised its power of freedom of speech in excess.

The Independent National Electoral Commission (INEC) had banned Rivers State chapter of the APC from fielding candidates in the last elections, because of the party's inability to solve its internal crisis and submit candidates’ list before INEC’s deadline.

PDP had alleged on Sunday that there was a plot to reverse the court judgment upholding the decision of INEC. It claimed that this would lead to a repeat poll, in which APC would contest.

The opposition party also accused Malami of mounting pressure on Justice Tanko Mohammed, the acting Chief Justice of Nigeria (CJN), to effect the reversal.

However, the AGF denied the allegation, stating that: “Regarding what was levelled against me by the PDP, I think it remains an accusation. It has to remain so until proven through a judicial process. But, for me, I think it is freedom of speech that has been taken too far.”
 

Elections Politics News AddThis :  Original Author :  SaharaReporters, New York Disable advertisements : 
Categories: audio

Nigerian Senate Proffers State Police, Proper Funding As Solutions To Banditry

11 April 2019 - 1:28am


The Nigerian Senate has said state policing and proper funding of the Nigeria Police Force (NPF) are the solutions to the banditry in some North-Western states of Nigeria.

Bukola Saraki, Nigeria’s Senate President, said this during the plenary on Wednesday, following a motion by Senators Emmanuel Bwacha from Taraba State and his colleague from Zamfara State, Kabir Marafa.

The lawmakers berated the Nigerian government over its inability to tackle the alarming rate of insecurity in the country, stressing that introduction of state Police remained the only solution to the menace.

Responding to the motion of the two lawmakers, the Senate President said apart from the establishment of community or state police, the funding of the Nigeria Police Force was essential to tackle the menace.

He said: “From the contributions we have had, I think it is key that we begin to look at the problem and look for long-term solutions. I think that what we did yesterday (Tuesday) in trying to strengthen the funding of the Police through the Police Reform Bill is right.

“The sooner that we can pass that bill will also help us in addressing the insecurity challenges.

“But more importantly is that we must go back to what a lot of us had been advocating here that there is the need for us to have state or community police. It is the way forward. Otherwise, we will continue to run into these problems.

“On the area of oversight, there is a lot also that we need to do to ensure that we hold the security agencies accountable. And we need to move very fast in this area.”

In its resolution, the Senate commended Nigerians, irrespective of cultural, religious and ethnic differences, for coming out in large numbers to show solidarity with the plight of victims of banditry in Zamfara.

The Senate also deliberated on making provision for N10billion in the 2019 appropriation bill as intervention fund to cater for Internally Displaced Persons and other persons affected by the activities of bandits in Zamfara State.

The Senate also urged the government to set up an ad hoc committee to be known as Presidential Initiative on Zamfara with a 10-year lifespan to manage the said funds and subsequent allocations and donations.

Marafa, who rose through orders 42 and 52 of the Senate standing rules to move his motion, said the problem of insecurity in Zamfara State was deteriorating daily, adding that this called for urgent legislative intervention.

Marafa said: “Since 2011, as a result of the unabating activities of the criminals in the state, roughly estimated 11,000 males have been killed, leaving behind an average of 22,000 widows and by extension, 44,000 orphans.

“These figures are just by conservative estimates because the figures are higher. Bandits and heavily armed kidnappers operate with little or no resistance in Gusau, the state capital, making less than 75 per cent of the people in Zamfara not to be sleeping in their houses.

“The situation has nothing to do with politics, because my own blood sister was brutally murdered in her matrimonial home in February this year and even two of my cousins were killed outside the state capital a few weeks back.”

Bwacha, on his own part, alerted the red chamber to the series of kidnappings in his state and suggested that there should be legislative backing for individuals who want to carry arms for self-defence.

The Deputy Senate President, Ike Ekweremadu, commended Marafa for always bringing the deteriorating security situation in Zamfara to the front burner of discourse in the Senate.

He said: “For the government to tackle the security problem headlong, the abnormality of Nigeria being the only federation with centralised police, must be addressed.”

The Senate Chief Whip, Olusola Adeyeye, said the problem of the country was the constitution itself, which he noted, provided for an “over- centralised federation or better put, unitary system as against a federal system of government.”

According to him, as long as the problematic constitution is not amended by way of removing policing from the exclusive list to the concurrent list to pave the way for state police, criminality at local levels will continue unabated.

Insurgency Police Politics News AddThis :  Original Author :  SaharaReporters, New York Disable advertisements : 
Categories: audio

Politicians Indicted For Electoral Fraud Should Be Banned From Rerun, Says Falana

11 April 2019 - 1:22am


Femi Falana, a Senior Advocate of Nigeria, says candidates indicted for electoral offences by election petition tribunals, should not be allowed to take part in rerun elections, where the polls are nullified.

The Lagos-based human rights lawyer, who spoke at the 9th Forum of the Anti-Corruption Situation Room, organised by the Human and Environmental Development Agenda (HEDA), in Abuja on Wednesday, said allowing those indicted for electoral offences to participate in rerun polls is tantamount to rewarding criminality.

He said: “Where people are indicted for committing electoral offences, if you are going to have a rerun, it is inequitable to allow such persons contest the election; that is like rewarding criminality.

"All the governors who were indicted in elections in the past were allowed to take part in the rerun election. In our laws, you are prohibited from benefitting from fraud. We should take that to the election petition tribunals.”

Speaking at the event, Professor Mahmood Yakubu, Chairman of the Independent National Electoral Commission (INEC), proposed a fine of N500,000 or a three-year jail term, or both, for persons convicted of vote-buying and selling in the country.

Yakubu, represented at the event by Festus Okoye, the INEC National Commissioner and Chairman, Information and Voter Education, said vote-buying and selling during elections in the country constitute a huge source of worry for the electoral umpire.

The INEC boss also tasked the National Assembly to accelerate work on the Electoral Offences Commission Bill. He explained that that way, there would be a separate agency saddled with the investigation and prosecution of electoral offences and offenders.

He said: “The National Assembly should isolate vote-buying and selling and properly define it. Make it a separate item in the Electoral Act and provide sanction for violation. The punishment for vote-buying should be increased and made stiffer to act as deterrent to buyers and sellers. Those who commit the offence of buying and selling should be made to pay a fine of N500,000 or be subjected to three years imprisonment, or both.

“Restriction on the use of smart phones in polling units should be put into the Electoral Act and violators should be liable on conviction to a fine of N500,000 or three years imprisonment or both.”

CRIME Elections Politics Scandal News AddThis :  Original Author :  SaharaReporters, New York Disable advertisements : 
Categories: audio

Politicians Indicted For Electoral Fraud Should Be Banned From Rerun, Says Falana

11 April 2019 - 1:22am


Femi Falana, a Senior Advocate of Nigeria, says candidates indicted for electoral offences by election petition tribunals, should not be allowed to take part in rerun elections, where the polls are nullified.

The Lagos-based human rights lawyer, who spoke at the 9th Forum of the Anti-Corruption Situation Room, organised by the Human and Environmental Development Agenda (HEDA), in Abuja on Wednesday, said allowing those indicted for electoral offences to participate in rerun polls is tantamount to rewarding criminality.

He said: “Where people are indicted for committing electoral offences, if you are going to have a rerun, it is inequitable to allow such persons contest the election; that is like rewarding criminality.

"All the governors who were indicted in elections in the past were allowed to take part in the rerun election. In our laws, you are prohibited from benefitting from fraud. We should take that to the election petition tribunals.”

Speaking at the event, Professor Mahmood Yakubu, Chairman of the Independent National Electoral Commission (INEC), proposed a fine of N500,000 or a three-year jail term, or both, for persons convicted of vote-buying and selling in the country.

Yakubu, represented at the event by Festus Okoye, the INEC National Commissioner and Chairman, Information and Voter Education, said vote-buying and selling during elections in the country constitute a huge source of worry for the electoral umpire.

The INEC boss also tasked the National Assembly to accelerate work on the Electoral Offences Commission Bill. He explained that that way, there would be a separate agency saddled with the investigation and prosecution of electoral offences and offenders.

He said: “The National Assembly should isolate vote-buying and selling and properly define it. Make it a separate item in the Electoral Act and provide sanction for violation. The punishment for vote-buying should be increased and made stiffer to act as deterrent to buyers and sellers. Those who commit the offence of buying and selling should be made to pay a fine of N500,000 or be subjected to three years imprisonment, or both.

“Restriction on the use of smart phones in polling units should be put into the Electoral Act and violators should be liable on conviction to a fine of N500,000 or three years imprisonment or both.”

CRIME Elections Politics Scandal News AddThis :  Original Author :  SaharaReporters, New York Disable advertisements : 
Categories: audio

NAF Destroys Eight Bandits’ Camps In Zamfara

11 April 2019 - 1:22am


Ibikunle Daramola

Ibikunle Daramola

The Nigerian Air Force (NAF) says it has destroyed bandits' hideout in Zamfara State and killed scores in an airstrike carried out in the location. 

Air Commodore Ibikunle Daramola, NAF Director of Public Relations and Information, made this known in a statement issued on Wednesday, revealing that eight camps were wiped out in the operation by the Air Task Force for Operation Diran Mikiya.

The bandits’ camps were discovered in Doumborou, Sububu, West Malamawa, Baturia Pond, Kagara Forest, Kamarawa, Kunduma and Rugu Forest areas of the state.

The Air Force also revealed that additional fighter jets had been deployed in the North-West for air interdiction missions.

He said: “The air strikes were intensified on Monday with the deployment of additional aircraft aimed at flushing out the bandits from their hideouts in Sububu, Rugu and Kagara forests.

“On the first day of the operation, the ATF conducted coordinated air raids against multiple identified bandits’ hideouts at Doumborou, Sububu, West Malamawa, Baturia Pond and Rugu Forest, where several bandits were neutralised and their camps destroyed.

“On Tuesday, the ATF conducted waves of attacks against three other locations. In all, we degraded eight camps and neutralised scores of bandits.

“Reports indicate that, as a result of the air strikes, some bandits are fleeing towards the border between Nigeria and the Niger Republic. Accordingly, the ATF is liaising with relevant authorities to ensure that the bandits are prevented from escaping through the southern part of Niger Republic.”

The Air Force said it was working with the ground forces and other agencies to sustain efforts at ending banditry in the North-West region.
 

Boko Haram Insurgency Military Terrorism News AddThis :  Original Author :  SaharaReporters, New York Disable advertisements : 
Categories: audio

NAF Destroys Eight Bandits’ Camps In Zamfara

11 April 2019 - 1:22am


Ibikunle Daramola

Ibikunle Daramola

The Nigerian Air Force (NAF) says it has destroyed bandits' hideout in Zamfara State and killed scores in an airstrike carried out in the location. 

Air Commodore Ibikunle Daramola, NAF Director of Public Relations and Information, made this known in a statement issued on Wednesday, revealing that eight camps were wiped out in the operation by the Air Task Force for Operation Diran Mikiya.

The bandits’ camps were discovered in Doumborou, Sububu, West Malamawa, Baturia Pond, Kagara Forest, Kamarawa, Kunduma and Rugu Forest areas of the state.

The Air Force also revealed that additional fighter jets had been deployed in the North-West for air interdiction missions.

He said: “The air strikes were intensified on Monday with the deployment of additional aircraft aimed at flushing out the bandits from their hideouts in Sububu, Rugu and Kagara forests.

“On the first day of the operation, the ATF conducted coordinated air raids against multiple identified bandits’ hideouts at Doumborou, Sububu, West Malamawa, Baturia Pond and Rugu Forest, where several bandits were neutralised and their camps destroyed.

“On Tuesday, the ATF conducted waves of attacks against three other locations. In all, we degraded eight camps and neutralised scores of bandits.

“Reports indicate that, as a result of the air strikes, some bandits are fleeing towards the border between Nigeria and the Niger Republic. Accordingly, the ATF is liaising with relevant authorities to ensure that the bandits are prevented from escaping through the southern part of Niger Republic.”

The Air Force said it was working with the ground forces and other agencies to sustain efforts at ending banditry in the North-West region.
 

Boko Haram Insurgency Military Terrorism News AddThis :  Original Author :  SaharaReporters, New York Disable advertisements : 
Categories: audio

Bandits Have Taken Over Parts Of Katsina, Governor Laments

11 April 2019 - 1:17am


Aminu Masari, Governor of Katsina State, has lamented the high presence of bandits in some parts of the state.

The Governor, represented by his deputy, Mannir Yakubu, at a stakeholders' forum in the state, told this to Muhammed Adamu, the acting Inspector General of Police (IGP), on Wednesday.

According to the Governor, aside from the presence of bandits, kidnappers also constituted a menace to the state.

“These bandits strike at will, maim at will, destroy lives and property at will. In other parts of the state, we also have kidnappers who not only take people on the road but in the comfort of their homes,” he added, citing the “unfortunate incident of the Governor’s in-law who was taken in the comfort of her home".

He said government officials have met with eight front-line local government chairmen to keep them abreast of the security situation. He also gave the assurance that government would do all possible to see to the final onslaught on the bandits and kidnappers in the state.

The eight LGs are Jibia, Batsari, Safana, Dan-Musa, Faskari, Sabuwa, Dandume and Kankara. Some of the LGs share boundaries with Zamfara State, which is under constant attacks from bandits and kidnappers.

In his remarks, the IGP said he was in the state to look into the security challenges, especially the activities of kidnappers and bandits.

He said the Police needed information on activities of “these miscreants”, noting that the latest strategy of the Police is to take the fight to the kidnappers by identifying them, occupying their location and camps.

Meanwhile, Manir Muazu, the Caretaker Chairman of the Batsari Local Government Area, revealed that bandits killed five people at Garimi/Magaji Ado ward along Jibia/Batsari Road, on Tuesday. 

The council boss said the bandits also injured 10 people while shops and vehicles were set ablaze.

Adamu assured the forum that his squad meant business and would flush out the bandits.
 

CRIME Insurgency Politics News AddThis :  Original Author :  SaharaReporters, New York Disable advertisements : 
Categories: audio